Castle Pines Golf Club

Hole

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

out

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

in

Yards

644

408

462

205

477

417

185

535

458

3791

485

197

440

439

623

403

209

492

480

3768

7559

Hndcp

9

13

5

15

1

7

17

11

3

2

18

4

10

12

14

8

16

6

Par

5

4

4

3

4

4

3

5

4

36

4

3

4

4

5

4

3

5

4

36

72

Castle Pines: Thirty minutes south and 1,000 ft. above Denver, Colorado, this course near Castle Rock was designed by Jack Nicklaus and opened in 1981. At 7,495 yards, par 72, it is the longest course on the PGA Tour. Despite its enormous length, it is the frequent variations in elevation that most characterize this layout as well as the preferences of its architect. Nicklaus has said that he prefers high tees where the golfer can see the entire panorama of the hole before him. Here though, there are as many holes ascending as their are descending. Each Nine begins downhill toward relatively level terrain and then returns uphill. Landing areas for drives are generous and offer alternative routes for the thinking player. The greens are mostly large, but vary considerably in shape and contour. The First hole is a par-5, 644 yards downhill. It is the longest hole on the PGA tour, but because of the high thin air and the drop of 120 feet in elevation, it is reachable in two. Wind is a major influence on play and if the breeze is strong, the 205 yard, par-3, Fourth green can be difficult to hit. The Fifth is 477 yards uphill with bunkers guarding the drive area and the green, making par-4 difficult to achieve. It and the following Eighth, again uphill are the most difficult statistically on the course. The Ninth continues the climb and it is long too, 458 yards. The back-side Tenth begins another descent 485 yards to an angled green that slopes from front to back and is guarded by a large pond on the right. The signature Twelfth features a tight fairway with the approach to a narrow green protected by bunkers on the right and a rocky stream on the left. Colorful flowering shrubs and bushes grow from the rocks making the approach one of the most beautiful scenes on the course The three finishing holes return home in an ascending crescendo. The 207 yard, Par-3, Sixteenth rises only about 12 feet, but the elevated green is narrow in front, abrupt in back and difficult to see. It is the longest and most difficult of the Par 3's and requires a perfect long-iron to get close. A deep pot-bunker in the left elbow of the putting surface awaits the errant approach. The Par-5, Seventeenth is short at 492 yards. It is reachable in two, but it is uphill all the way to a partially hidden green surrounded by deep grass and bunkers. The uphill finishing hole, 480 yard, par-4, like the 3rd, offers two avenues to the green. The lower route is more direct, but the approach must contend with multiple rolling bunkers and a high shallow green. Throughout the course trickling streams frequently cut back and forth across the fairways sometimes snatching the unmindful shot. Deceptively benign ponds protect innocently inviting greens. The tall Cedars and Oaks, sometimes wall-like, line the fairways and sometimes intrude among them. Panoramic views of the distant plains and majestic mountains threaten to distract one's concentration. Castle Pines in it's short existence has become one of America's top tour stops and one of the favorite courses in the country. Castle Pines was the site for the PGA's International, which uniquely uses the Modified Stableford method of scoring to determine the winner. The tournament was canceled following the 2006 season.


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Artists' Golf is a conceptual work of art Copyright 1995 - 2008 by David B. Lewis and all original paintings, drawings and art works are Copyright by David B. Lewis. All rights reserved.  Maps of existing courses are original artistic interpretations and impressions from a variety of sources and are not intended to be accurate renderings or representations of the actual courses.  They indicate my interest and study and are intended purely for the pleasure and information of the viewers and are not for sale or profit.