Oakland Hills Country Club: South Course

Hole

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

out

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

in

Yards

435

523

198

430

465

360

411

482

220

3524

453

423

561

171

473

401

406

201

492

3456

7105

Hndcp

5

9

17

3

1

13

7

11

15

4

8

10

18

2

12

6

16

14

Par

4

5

3

4

4

4

4

5

3

36

4

4

5

3

4

4

4

3

5

36

72

Oakland Hills; South Course: This is a classic test of golf designed by Donald Ross over rolling Michigan farmland. Now a part of suburban Detroit the course opened in 1918 and was host to the U.S. Open in 1924. A second U.S. Open was played there in 1937 when Sam Snead lost one of his best chances to win an Open. Robert Trent Jones was brought in to update and toughen the layout before the third Open was played there in 1951. That was the year that Ben Hogan won and referred to the revised course as a "Monster". Since then the course has hosted two PGA Championships and two more U.S. Opens, the last in 1996 won by Steve Jones. The revisions made by Robert Trent Jones were most evident in the placement and number of bunkers throughout the course. Obsolete bunkers were filled in and new ones cut to pinch the fairways near the landing areas from off the tees. Bunkers were also added and deepened around the greens. Normally the South Course plays to a par of 72, but for the Opens the 8th and 18th are reduced to par-4's by moving up the tees resulting in a par of 70 and total yardage around 7,054. With fairways cut narrow and rough left high the course then truly is a Monster. The greens are fairly large and mostly elevated. Generally they slope from the back down toward the front. The 16th, a lovely dogleg right around a small lake surrounded by willows is regarded as the signature hole. The preceding 15th is notable for the unique bunker in the center of the fairway near the landing area. The 5th with its fairway broken by a small stream is rated as the most difficult, but the 473 yard par-4 14th is no picnic, especially when played dead into the wind. The 2004 Ryder Cup Matches were played here in mid-September and the Europeans routed the Americans with the largest defeat margin in the history of the event, 18.5 to 9.5.  The course was played as a par 70 with the 8th and the 18th played to par 4,  The 18th at 495 yards, was the longest par 4 in the history of the Ryder Cup competitions.  In the three days of the event not one player birdied the 18th and if a match actually reached there par won the hole.


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Artists' Golf is a conceptual work of art Copyright 1995 - 2008 by David B. Lewis and all original paintings, drawings and art works are Copyright by David B. Lewis. All rights reserved.  Maps of existing courses are original artistic interpretations and impressions from a variety of sources and are not intended to be accurate renderings or representations of the actual courses.  They indicate my interest and study and are intended purely for the pleasure and information of the viewers and are not for sale or profit.