Pebble Beach Golf Links

Hole

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

out

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

in

Yards

373

502

388

327

166

516

107

431

464

3274

426

384

202

392

565

397

402

209

548

3525

6799

Hndcp

8

10

12

16

14

2

18

6

4

7

5

17

9

1

13

11

15

3

Par

4

5

4

4

3

5

3

4

4

36

4

4

3

4

5

4

4

3

5

36

72

Pebble Beach: This links course was designed by two California State Amateur champions, Jack Neville and Douglas Grant. It lies along the shores of Carmel Bay where the swirling California current meets the warm updrafts from the Southern Hemisphere. This idyllic layout remains the only one of its stature to be open to public play. The conflicting elements of water, earth and air come together here in a perfect union of unpredictable balance to always offer the golfer a challenge worthy of Nature's own integrity. The Par 72, 6,799 yard traversal explores the distinctive character of the California coast like no other. Like many British Links the route flows out to a distant point, then back. Number One, a short dog-leg right, opens innocently into the next four fairly ordinary, but varied holes until one is abruptly transferred through the trees onto the ocean cliffs to the Sixth green. Byron Nelson has called that 515 yard, par-5 Sixth the toughest hole on the course. It and the following four holes string together some of the most spectacular and challenging holes in golf. The par-3 Seventh beckons with its tempting beauty, so short, so easy before the swing. Usually just a Pitching Wedge away, club selection can be difficult when the wind is high. In the 1960 Crosby, Ken Venturi hit a 3-iron into a gale on his way to victory in the final round. Sam Snead once putted down the slope to avoid the wind. That option no longer exist since vegetation has been planted there, but also the green has been enlarged. The Eighth masquerades behind hills, cliffs and ocean. The drive is to an unseen landing area just short of the cliffs. Nicklaus has called the long approach over the ocean the most dramatic second shot in golf. Palmer says it's the best Par-4 he's ever played. The Ninth is a robber whose jagged cliffs can grab the purse of even the most protective participant. Statistically it is the toughest hole on the course for the Pros. The Tenth offers no reprieve where the green clings to the hazard more than any of the other cliff holes. If the next six holes are underrated it is only because of the magnificence of the last two. The 218 yard, par-3 Seventeenth, surrounded by rocky beach and ocean demands accurate club selection depending on the coastal winds and the placement of the pin on the pinched and hump-backed green. The Eighteenth is one of the classic finishing holes of golf. A 540-yard par-5, it snakes precariously along the jagged coastline on the left and trees on the right. To reach the green in two requires not only two great shots, but plenty of help from the natural elements or spirits. Whichever, it is a dramatic and testing finish to one of the most revered and intriguing of the world's golf courses. The Tour's annual National Pro-Am is played on this course for 2 of its rounds and the course will hosted the U.S. Open in 2000, won by Tiger Woods.   A new hole designed by Jack Nicklaus, the par-3, 5th, now has replaced the original inland 5th. The huge trees that guarded the left side of the 2nd hole were damaged and had to be removed, which has left the green indefensible.  That hole as well as the 18th were designated as par-4's for the 2000 Open and the course played to a par of 70.


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Artists' Golf is a conceptual work of art Copyright 1995 - 2008 by David B. Lewis and all original paintings, drawings and art works are Copyright by David B. Lewis. All rights reserved.  Maps of existing courses are original artistic interpretations and impressions from a variety of sources and are not intended to be accurate renderings or representations of the actual courses.  They indicate my interest and study and are intended purely for the pleasure and information of the viewers and are not for sale or profit.