Riviera Country Club

Hole

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

out

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

in

Yards

503

463

434

236

419

175

408

370

420

3428

315

564

410

421

176

443

166

576

451

3522

6950

Hndcp

17

1

5

7

9

15

11

13

3

16

10

6

8

18

2

14

12

4

Par

5

4

4

3

4

3

4

4

4

35

4

5

4

4

3

4

3

5

4

36

71

Riviera: Long considered one of America's great courses, this George C. Thomas layout plays to a Par 71 over it's 6,956 yards. Almost hidden high above the Pacific Ocean among the wealthy homes in the Pacific Palisades hills just west of Los Angeles, Riviera has played host to famous celebrities and some of the greatest moments in golf history. Ben Hogan shot an American Open record 276 here in 1948 that stood for nineteen years and made his comeback from a nearly fatal car crash in 1950 when he tied Sam Snead at the Los Angeles Open, but lost in a playoff. Perhaps the reason Hogan played so well at Riviera was due to his shoemaking ability. The course demands accuracy and the ability to shape shots from the tees in order to set up the advantageous approach into the mostly small greens. The positions of the bunkers around the greens favor a fade and the ability to cut the shot in order to stop the ball quickly on long approaches. Three of the most difficult holes are on the front side. After a relatively easy start downhill to the par-5 First, the 463 yard Second seems even longer because it's all uphill back toward the clubhouse. The 236 yard par-3 Fourth demands accuracy with a long iron or wood and can be extremely tricky in the swirling breezes off the Pacific Ocean. The Ninth is a punishing 420 yards again uphill with a steep approach to a partially hidden green well guarded by bunkers on the right front. The Tenth is a classic short par-4. At only 315 yards downhill it is drivable, but most of the pros lay up short for fear of a disastrous miss-hit right or left off the tee. The Seventeenth is a long arduous 576 yard journey uphill and leads to the even more steeply inclined Eighteenth which provides plenty of excitement for tournament finishes. Riviera has long been the site of the Los Angeles Open and in 1995 hosted the PGA Championship. In 1998 the course hosted the Senior's Open Championship. The Players arrive typically in February for the L.A. Open.


For questions or comments please send e-mail to David.


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Artists' Golf is a conceptual work of art Copyright 1995 - 2008 by David B. Lewis and all original paintings, drawings and art works are Copyright by David B. Lewis. All rights reserved.  Maps of existing courses are original artistic interpretations and impressions from a variety of sources and are not intended to be accurate renderings or representations of the actual courses.  They indicate my interest and study and are intended purely for the pleasure and information of the viewers and are not for sale or profit.