Shinnecock Hills

Hole

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

out

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

in

Yards

391

221

456

409

529

456

184

361

411

3418

412

158

469

372

447

408

542

169

426

3395

6813

Hndcp

11

17

3

7

9

1

15

13

5

4

16

2

12

6

14

8

18

10

Par

4

3

4

4

5

4

3

4

4

35

4

3

4

4

4

4

5

3

4

35

70

Shinnecock Hills: Founded in 1891, this course was designed by the Scottish professional Willie Dunn and built by Native American Indians from the nearby Shinnecock Indian Reservation at the end of Long Island in Southampton, New York.  Five of the Dunn holes were retained when Charles B. Macdonald and Seth Raynor redesigned the course in 1916.  A second redesign by Howard C. Toomey and Willam S. Flynn in 1931kept intact five holes and the green from the sixth.  The course, though technically not a linksland layout, bears a strong resemblance and atmosphere to one.  Like many of the classic courses Shinnecock is not long by modern standards, but over the years and through three U.S. Opens it has proven to be an intimidating challenge.  The first U.S. Open to be played here was in 1896, the 2nd, and was won by James Foulis.  The next ninety years later was a triumph for Raymond Floyd.  And just 9 years later in the 95th U.S. Open Corey Pavin won with a blistering fairway wood approach to the eighteenth.  Shinnecock will once again host the U.S. Open in 2004 when the course length will be stretched an additional 131 to 6944 yards.  The course is rated 74.5 with a slope of 140 for this card and 75.1 with a slope of 142 for the U.S. Open.


For questions or comments please send e-mail to David.


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Artists' Golf is a conceptual work of art Copyright 1995 - 2008 by David B. Lewis and all original paintings, drawings and art works are Copyright by David B. Lewis. All rights reserved.  Maps of existing courses are original artistic interpretations and impressions from a variety of sources and are not intended to be accurate renderings or representations of the actual courses.  They indicate my interest and study and are intended purely for the pleasure and information of the viewers and are not for sale or profit.