The Country Club

Hole

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

out

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

in

 
Yards

452

185

448

338

439

312

201

385

510

3270

439

453

450

433

528

434

185

381

438

3741

7011

Hndcp

5

15

1

13

7

17

11

9

3

 

18

8

16

2

10

4

14

12

6

   
Par

4

3

4

4

4

4

3

4

5

35

4

4

3

4

5

4

3

4

4

36

71

The Country Club:  Hailed as the first Country Club of the United States founded in 1882, the first 6 holes of the course, designed by three members,  were laid out in 1892.  Twelve additional holes were added by 1909.  This Course held the 1913 U.S. Open when Francis Ouimet, only 20 years old and a former caddy, won over the favored players from Great Britain.  Nine additional holes, the Primrose, were added to make a 27 hole layout in 1927.  For major Championships holes 1, 8 and 9 from the Primrose course replace holes 9, 10 and 12 of the original eighteen which creates a longer and more challenging test.  Not that the course length is great by today's standards, but with the narrow fairways, elevation changes and small greens, the layout has been a worthy site for many great competitive events.  Indeed, Julius Boro's 9-over won the 1963 U.S. Open.  Before the third U.S. Open in 1988 Rees Jones was employed to improve and restore the composite course.  That Open was a thrilling event when Curtis Strange and Nick Faldo went into the final hole tied and finished that way.  Strange won the eighteen hole playoff the following day by 4 strokes.  More history was added to the legacy of the Country Club when the U.S. staged one of the greatest comebacks in golf lore to beat the Europeans in the Ryder Cup of 1999.

A really fine recreation for Links 2003 has been done by Eddie Schmidt.  The course can be downloaded for free from the Links Corner.


For questions or comments please send e-mail to David.


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Artists' Golf is a conceptual work of art Copyright 1995 - 2008 by David B. Lewis and all original paintings, drawings and art works are Copyright by David B. Lewis. All rights reserved.  Maps of existing courses are original artistic interpretations and impressions from a variety of sources and are not intended to be accurate renderings or representations of the actual courses.  They indicate my interest and study and are intended purely for the pleasure and information of the viewers and are not for sale or profit.